< Zurück | Inhalt | Weiter >

policytool

Remember how we had to set up a security policy file for our RMI demonstration (Example 5.13)? Well, this is a Java GUI application for creating and editing Java policy files.

There are a few more. One group of utilities is related to Kerberos tickets. Another is related to Java IDL and RMI-IIOP, both of which are to allow Java to interoperate with CORBA. If you are in a CORBA environment, you will want to look at those. We’ve got enough on our plates without trying to jam CORBA in here. You’re on your own, buddy. Finally, there are a couple of


programs that support the Java plug-in, which is a way to make Java available in browsers.30


5.13 REVIEW


For all of its humble command-line interface, the Sun Java 2 SDK provides a complete software development package, with everything you need to write and run a wide gamut of Java applications.


5.14 WHAT YOU STILL DONT KNOW


Oh dear, where to start? There are all those programs in the kit we glossed over right at the end there. We barely scratched the surface of JNI and RMI. We positively orbited the topics of policy files and JAR manifests.

You now have exposure to the bulk of the Java SDK. It is only the first step up the learning curve. We’ll take you up a few more as the book progresses, but mastery comes only with time and experience. So use the tools. Write, compile, and debug a lot of Java code.


5.15 RESOURCES


One of the best sources of information on Java is Sun’s Web site for Java, http://java.sun.com, where you can find a wide variety of information— tutorials, white papers, API specifications, and more.


image

30. Those browsers that had Java built into them generally used Java 1.0 or 1.1. After Java 1.1 it became clear that it would be a major pain to have to reintegrate each new version of Java into each browser product. It would make browser versions and Java releases dependent on one another and would, in general, be a pain both for Sun and for Microsoft and Netscape (remem- ber Netscape?). Thus, the plug-in architecture was born (okay, plug-ins were for things like RealPlayer and Macromedia Flash too). Since Java 1.2, browser integration has been via plug-ins.