This guide walks you through the process of building a Docker image for running a Spring Boot application.

What you’ll build

Docker is a Linux container management toolkit with a "social" aspect, allowing users to publish container images and consume those published by others. A Docker image is a recipe for running a containerized process, and in this guide we will build one for a simple Spring boot application.

What you’ll need

If you are NOT using a Linux machine, you will need a virtualized server. By installing VirtualBox, other tools like the Mac’s boot2docker, can seamlessly manage it for you. Visit VirtualBox’s download site and pick the version for your machine. Download and install. Don’t worry about actually running it.

You will also need Docker, which only runs on 64-bit machines. See https://docs.docker.com/installation/#installation for details on setting Docker up for your machine. Before proceeding further, verify you can run docker commands from the shell. If you are using boot2docker you need to run that first.

How to complete this guide

Like most Spring Getting Started guides, you can start from scratch and complete each step, or you can bypass basic setup steps that are already familiar to you. Either way, you end up with working code.

To start from scratch, move on to Build with Gradle.

To skip the basics, do the following:

When you’re finished, you can check your results against the code in gs-spring-boot-docker/complete.

Build with Gradle

First you set up a basic build script. You can use any build system you like when building apps with Spring, but the code you need to work with Gradle and Maven is included here. If you’re not familiar with either, refer to Building Java Projects with Gradle or Building Java Projects with Maven.

Create the directory structure

In a project directory of your choosing, create the following subdirectory structure; for example, with mkdir -p src/main/java/hello on *nix systems:

└── src
    └── main
        └── java
            └── hello

Create a Gradle build file

build.gradle

buildscript {
    repositories {
        mavenCentral()
    }
    dependencies {
        classpath("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-gradle-plugin:2.0.3.RELEASE")
    }
}

apply plugin: 'java'
apply plugin: 'eclipse'
apply plugin: 'idea'
apply plugin: 'org.springframework.boot'
apply plugin: 'io.spring.dependency-management'

bootJar {
    baseName = 'gs-spring-boot-docker'
    version =  '0.1.0'
}

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}

sourceCompatibility = 1.8
targetCompatibility = 1.8

dependencies {
    compile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-web")
    testCompile("org.springframework.boot:spring-boot-starter-test")
}

The Spring Boot gradle plugin provides many convenient features:

  • It collects all the jars on the classpath and builds a single, runnable "über-jar", which makes it more convenient to execute and transport your service.

  • It searches for the public static void main() method to flag as a runnable class.

  • It provides a built-in dependency resolver that sets the version number to match Spring Boot dependencies. You can override any version you wish, but it will default to Boot’s chosen set of versions.